End products of cellular respiration and photosynthesis relationship

Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis ( Read ) | Biology | CK Foundation

end products of cellular respiration and photosynthesis relationship

I. Cellular Respiration: breaking down sugar in the presence of oxygen (aerobic). Overall, it is the reverse reaction of photosynthesis, but chemically, the steps involved are . What's the connection? the 4 major steps in Cellular Respiration,; their location in the cell,; and the products generated at the end of each step. 3. The relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration is such that the products of one This is the never ending cycle that sustains life on earth. Photosynthesis uses energy from light to convert water and carbon dioxide molecules The ends of both the xylem and phloem transport systems can be seen within Carbon dioxide and water are formed as by-products of respiration (Figure 4). take up oxygen and convert glucose to maintain cell metabolic processes.

Oxygen is a byproduct, and this phase of photosynthesis is the opposite of oxidative phosporylation of the cellular respiration process, discussed below, in which oxygen is consumed.

Comparing Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

The dark phase of photosynthesis is also known as the Calvin Cycle. In this phase, which uses the products of the light phase, CO2 is used to make the sugar, glucose. Cellular Respiration Cellular respiration is the biochemical breakdown of a substrate through oxidation, wherein electrons are transferred from the substrate to an "electron acceptor," which can be any of a variety of compounds, or oxygen atoms.

  • Photosynthesis and Respiration
  • What is the connection between photosynthesis and cellular respiration?

If the substrate is a carbon- and oxygen-containing compound, such as glucose, carbon dioxide CO2 is produced through glycolysis, the breakdown of glucose. Glycolysis, which takes place in the cytoplasm of a cell, breaks glucose down to pyruvate, a more "oxidized" compound. If enough oxygen is present, pyruvate moves into specialized organelles called mitochondria. There, it is broken down into acetate and CO2. The CO2 is releasd.

Cellular Respiration

The acetate enters a reaction system known as the Krebs Cycle. This is opposite of one aspect of photosynthesis, the binding of carbons from CO2 together to make sugar.

end products of cellular respiration and photosynthesis relationship

In addition to CO2, the Krebs Cycle and glycolysis use energy from the chemical bonds of substrates such as glucose to form high-energy compounds such as ATP and GTP, which are used by cell systems.

Also produced are high-energy, reduced compounds: These compounds are the means by which electrons, which hold the energy derived initially from glucose or another food compound, are transferred to the next process, called the electron transport chain. For more information regarding the structure and function of xylem and phloem, review the Irrigation and Rootstock sections.

end products of cellular respiration and photosynthesis relationship

Leaves contain water which is necessary to convert light energy into glucose through photosynthesis. Leaves have two structures that minimize water loss, the cuticle and stomata. The cuticle is a waxy coating on the top and bottom of leaves which prevents water from evaporating into the atmosphere Figure 3a.

end products of cellular respiration and photosynthesis relationship

Although the cuticle provides important protection from excessive water loss, leaves cannot be impervious because they must also allow carbon dioxide in to be used in photosynthesisand oxygen out.

These gases move into and out of the leaf through openings on the underside called stomata Figure 3b. Respiration Photosynthesis is the process by which plants use light energy to convert carbon dioxide and water into sugars.

end products of cellular respiration and photosynthesis relationship

The sugars produced by photosynthesis can be stored, transported throughout the tree, and converted into energy which is used to power all cellular processes. Respiration occurs when glucose sugar produced during photosynthesis combines with oxygen to produce useable cellular energy.

Photosynthesis and Respiration

This energy is used to fuel growth and all of the normal cellular functions. Carbon dioxide and water are formed as by-products of respiration Figure 4.

end products of cellular respiration and photosynthesis relationship

Simple equation describing the molecules required for respiration and its products. Respiration occurs in all living cells, including leaves and roots.